People


Agalychnis callidryas Gaudy!You probably remember me mentioning the beautiful sound of the Saban tree frogs in previous posts. These elusive little creatures are legendary in the Caribbean as providers of bedtime lullaby, while tourists sometimes lie awake and wonder what that sound is! The tree frogs are part of what I love about the aliveness of living in the Caribbean – so close to nature, teeming with sounds, smells and sights that embrace Mother Earth. Whenever I return to the US, I feel much less connected to this dynamic force of nature, so unusually quiet, so far from the soil and the wildlife.
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Suzan: Saba's own SPCA!Remember when Joel & I experimented with having a puppy for the weekend? In that post, I had mentioned the Saba SPCA and promised to write about it. Now, keep in mind that we didn’t know Saba had an SPCA – we just stumbled across it, like all other things we learn on this island! I suppose it’s not too hard to stumble across things or people on a 5 square-mile island with only about 1400 inhabitants, but you’d be surprised.
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Popeye - Man of 12000 DivesHailing from Southwest Ontario and the south tip of Lake Huron, Popeye and his wife Grace came down from Canada to visit Saba for a second time after ten years away. We heard he was diving with SeaSaba so we tracked him down on Friday as hugs were taking place and he said his farewells to the crew. First of all I have to tell everyone, Popeye has more dives under his belt than 99% of the divers in the world which gives you “like celebrity” status down here – 12,538 dives to be exact!

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Uniqe StoreOn Saturday night, I realized we had forgotten some things at the grocery store. This is normally no big deal, since it’s just a hop, skip & a jump away from our house — however, the stores are closed on Sunday. Just like everything else we do, life in Saba requires more advance planning than if we were in the States. Once you get used to that, it starts to feel less inconvenient — and more normal. In fact, for those who are downshifting or wanting to live a more simple life, the fact that you have more limited access to things is condicive to focusing on just the basics of what you need.
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Kelley RainbowWhat’s it like to live on an island with a tourist trade? One of the side effects is that many people come and go. This is true for the dive community, for example, because one of the things dive masters & dive instructors like is the ability to live all over the world. I’ve met many fun and interesting people in the dive community – they have a sense of adventure that is appealing. They tend to be outgoing and friendly above the water – while being calming leaders below.
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Alex is surprised - Carolyn Laughs with PindaIs it possible to keep a surprise party a surprise on an island with 1500 residents? Carolyn was determined to make it happen as she planned her significant other’s birthday party. Alex is a dive instructor at Sea Saba — and an excellent one at that! Joel and I first met Alex when we were taking the Night Dive class as part of our PADI advanced open water program. He is from the Netherlands and speaks several languages fluently.
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Flip Flop Philosopher Meet Stuart — he’s a twenty-something from the Netherlands who has relocated to Saba. Stuart is a true Nexter — otherwise known as Generation Next, Generation Y, Millenials and Neters. They are born between 1980 and 2000 and have no recollection of the Reagan era or the Cold War. Technology has always been part of their lives, which has changed their thinking & learning styles. There are over 81 million Nexters — more than Baby Boomers — and they represent 30% of the current population. Watch for changes in the work environment as the Nexters enter the workforce. They could bring a new age of idealism and commitment into the workforce, if companies and society embraces their uniqueness. (Source: Generational Diversity – the Nexters)
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